The Google News tax, and how it’s failed elsewhere in Europe

So the Government’s new copyright law plans to allow news creators to charge news aggregators to use their stories. As part of the media buildup, the Government points to France or Germany, both of which have introduced similar laws recently. As I said yesterday, the new law is nonsense, pure pandering to elderly newspaper editors who don’t understand the Internet for short term political gain, and will stifle innovation whilst not touching the vast Internet giants Continue reading The Google News tax, and how it’s failed elsewhere in Europe

Spain stifles innovation – this new content law is useless.

The government has proposed a new Intellectual Property law that has everyone excited, because it contains what is called a “Google” tax. Note the proposed bit – it hasn’t been voted on yet. We don’t even, it seems, have the full draft of the law, it hasn’t been officially released. But people are excited. Now, the idea is that websites which use content from other people must pay a “fair usage fee”. In theory, it Continue reading Spain stifles innovation – this new content law is useless.

Spain, it seems, doesn’t actually have any real newspaper power

In the UK, the top dailies sell about 10 million copies a weekday. According to ABC figures. That means 1 major national daily is sold for every 6 citizens, right? Well, Pedro J Ramírez, flamboyant editor of El Mundo, makes the startling admission today that Spain today only has four national dailys, and only three of those manage to sell more than 100,000 copies a day. Meaning… about one national copy per 430 citizens. Pedro Continue reading Spain, it seems, doesn’t actually have any real newspaper power