5000 year old cave painting destroyed in Jaen

“Los Escolares” is a small cave, so called because it was discovered in 1973 by a bunch of schoolkids on an outing. The kids, venturing into this 1,5 metre square cave in Santa Elena (Jaen), were amazed to find an intact 5,000 year old cave painting at the back of the cave. The painting was later classified as an artefact worthy of being part of “history of humanity” by UNESCO, but it’s never been sealed Continue reading 5000 year old cave painting destroyed in Jaen

The birth of Los Gallardos – 1924 to 1927

My latest history pamphlet is out! Just in time for the 90th anniversary of Los Gallardos. In 1924 a small village called Los Gallardos broke away from its mountain neighbour of Bedar and formed an independent new village in Almeria, southern Spain. This is the story of these first steps of an independent and proud village that was only founded 50 years before independence. Here I investigate how independence came about, the key first steps Continue reading The birth of Los Gallardos – 1924 to 1927

The Voynich manuscript – an alternate pet theory of mine

Going heavily away from my usual topics here, but hey, it’s my blog and I’ll do what I want! If you’ve never heard of the Voynich manuscript then I suggest you stop reading now, otherwise you’ll just get confused. The whole topic started when I got interested in some of the mathematical analysis that has been performed on the text of the Voynich manuscript. I started following and repeating some of the exercises, before getting Continue reading The Voynich manuscript – an alternate pet theory of mine

RIP Don Diego Carrillo Flores

Don Diego, as he was universally known, passed away last Tuesday at his home in Mojácar. He was universally known and respected as the main doctor for Mojácar during the 50’s and 60’s, a position he held with great care, understanding and patience. He seems to have treated almost everyone who lived in the area during those years, and his fame as a doctor was well known, especially amongst expectant mothers, who would so often Continue reading RIP Don Diego Carrillo Flores

A brief overview of the history of the Levante Almeriense (part 2)

A brief overview of the history of the Levante Almeriense (part 2) [Read part one of the Brief history of the Levante Almeriense] On the 2nd of January 1492 Caliph Boabdil of the Caliphate of Granada surrendered to the Catholic Kings, Isabel & Ferdinand. As he rode with his royal procession towards the coast to embark back to Africa, he reined in at the famous mountain pass above Granada called the suspiro del moro (sigh Continue reading A brief overview of the history of the Levante Almeriense (part 2)

A brief overview of the history of the Levante Almeriense (part 1)

Note: This article originally appeared in”The New Entertainer“, August 2008 edition. Part 1! A brief overview of the early history of the Levante Almeriense. The collapse of the Roman empire, never very well established in what would become the Levante Almeriense (basically, the area was used as a fish processing plant and shoe factory exploiting the Esparto grass that grows here; the only known Roman remains here locally are in Cadima, Los Gallardos, where the Continue reading A brief overview of the history of the Levante Almeriense (part 1)

A brief history of Bedar from the Romans to the British

The collapse of the Roman empire, never very well established in what would become the Levante Almeriense (basically, the area was used as a fish processing plant and shoe factory using the Esparto grass that grows here, the only known Roman remains here are in Cadima, Los Gallardos), left what were small villages and fortified farms along the coastline vaguely united under the Count of Teodorimo. This continued for several centuries (III-IIX centures c.e.), as Continue reading A brief history of Bedar from the Romans to the British