Who was Adolfo Suárez?

Spain is in mourning for Adolfo Suárez, the first democratic President of Spain, who died on Sunday. But, who was he, and why have most people never heard of him? His tale is a interesting and intriguing one – for most Spaniards associate him with the hope that followed the death of the military dictator Franco, when anything seemed possible, and before they became disillusioned with their politicians.

Things we didn’t know: King of Spain is also King of Jerusalem

A useful bit of trivia for your next pub quiz: King Juan Carlos also happens to be the King of Jerusalem, although I don’t know if anyone has told the Israelis. His Majesty Juan Carlos the First, By the Grace of God, the King of Spain, King of Castile, of León, of Aragon, of the Two Sicilies, of Jerusalem, of Navarre, of Granada, of Seville, of Toledo, of Valencia, of Galicia, of Sardinia, of Córdoba, Continue reading Things we didn’t know: King of Spain is also King of Jerusalem

Why it’s called “Almanzora”

A tale is told to me of how the Almanzora river got its name*… Locals say that their ancestors told them that the name comes from Moorish times, when Caliph Mohammed Almanzor was returning with his troops from a sortie into the Levante. When he reached the banks of this river, he was warned by an old crone of its dangerous flash floods. Seeing the storm clouds gathering in the mountains, he wisely decided to Continue reading Why it’s called “Almanzora”

A brief history of the first road between Los Gallardos & Garrucha

As we speed down the A370 towards Garrucha (or up towards Pedro’s petrol station at Los Gallardos) we often forget about the first ancient and twisting road between the two villages, the AL150, which heads off at the Alfaix motorway junction towards Turre. This article has been moved and updated. It is now available from this page or you can purchase the whole article in pdf format for just €1 by pressing the button below. Continue reading A brief history of the first road between Los Gallardos & Garrucha

More nicknames

Sometime ago I wrote about local nicknames, apodos, such as the unfortunate “follachinos” (chino, here, being the ancient word for swine, not the nationality) or “seis pesetas”. See (Garrucha celebrates the people of its past). I´ve been quietly accumulating at the back of my mind more of these local gems. Hopefully, none of the owners of these apodos read this website… Some of them are rather crude, more suitable to an agrarian society and I Continue reading More nicknames

The Voynich manuscript – an alternate pet theory of mine

Going heavily away from my usual topics here, but hey, it’s my blog and I’ll do what I want! If you’ve never heard of the Voynich manuscript then I suggest you stop reading now, otherwise you’ll just get confused. The whole topic started when I got interested in some of the mathematical analysis that has been performed on the text of the Voynich manuscript. I started following and repeating some of the exercises, before getting Continue reading The Voynich manuscript – an alternate pet theory of mine

The anniversary of the Battle of Salamance sees The Rifles regiment honoured by Salamanca

Tomorrow is the bicentenary of the Battle of Salamanca, in which British, Portuguese and Spanish troops under the Earl (later Duke) of Wellington defeated Napoleon’s Marshal Auguste Marmont in the rolling hills of Castilla y Leon, western Spain. To mark the anniversary of the first major offensive victory of the Peninsular War, one of the British Army’s “large regiments”, The Rifles, will be granted the unique honour of the Freedom of the City of Salamanca. Continue reading The anniversary of the Battle of Salamance sees The Rifles regiment honoured by Salamanca

Spain reflects on 30 year anniversary of “The Almeria Case” – when police tortured and shot 3 innocent tourists

Tomorrow, 10th of May, will be the 30th anniversary of one of Spain’s most notorious cases of police brutality, when three young men on holiday in Roquetas del Mar and Pechina were tortured to death by the Guardia Civil after police wrongly thought them to be wanted ETA terrorists. Luis Cobo Mier, Juan Mañas Morales & Luis Montero García were three young men who had taken a long weekend off work at their workplaces in Continue reading Spain reflects on 30 year anniversary of “The Almeria Case” – when police tortured and shot 3 innocent tourists

RIP Don Diego Carrillo Flores

Don Diego, as he was universally known, passed away last Tuesday at his home in Mojácar. He was universally known and respected as the main doctor for Mojácar during the 50’s and 60’s, a position he held with great care, understanding and patience. He seems to have treated almost everyone who lived in the area during those years, and his fame as a doctor was well known, especially amongst expectant mothers, who would so often Continue reading RIP Don Diego Carrillo Flores